OUR sketching kits!!!

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gpathy
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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by gpathy » Wed Sep 19, 2012 3:29 pm

Mathew,Gorgeous stuff !

Rajesh,
Btw, while I was trying to be smart about a small book for thumbnails..today I was dumbfounded when I saw my daughter doodling on a small handy block of paper sheets.. guess what...a memo pad!you know the non-sticky ones .. very comfortable to hold.

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by mdmattin » Tue Oct 02, 2012 3:51 am

Miatagrrl wrote:Does this mean you are no longer carrying a bound sketchbook (Moleskine) anymore?
That was my plan, but after a few days I found that the Handbook had crept back into my back pocket. For one thing, the tools in the belt carrier are difficult to deploy surreptitiously. For another, I kind of like having a chronological journal as well as separate sheets of paper.
I got to try out the butting two sheets together idea and it seems to work pretty well.
Matthew

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by Miatagrrl » Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:07 pm

Although I love handmade books and have occasionally dabbled in binding my own books, I haven't been motivated to spend a lot of time doing it. But just recently I found a need for a thin, lightweight sketchbook (and have been looking at the ideas in this thread with much interest), so I got motivated to make a simple one that suits my needs: the Greeting Card Sketchbook. Please see my blog for details: http://www.tina-koyama.blogspot.com/201 ... hbook.html
2 books.jpg
Greeting Card Sketchbooks
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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by RajeshS » Sun Oct 14, 2012 3:49 am

OH this is very good idea! Very cool. And the sketch!

rajesh

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by gpathy » Sun Oct 14, 2012 3:21 pm

Lovely book. paper looks delicious! nice sketch of course!

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by gpathy » Sun Oct 14, 2012 3:24 pm

On this topic.. I was wondering what the opinion is on a support? I am sure this is discussed someplace. Since I started sketching outside.. one problem is my inability to hold my sketchpad for longer periods. I settled finally on A4. since it allows flexible formats. for small thumbnails, to a decent landscape, portrait. but finding it hard to keep it on my lap, or any such manner. I see in all your kits smaller notebooks. So is A4 not the best for sketching outside?
Any suggestions/pointers?

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by mike » Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:25 pm

For quick & unexpected sketch moments there's little to beat a small pocket sized moleskin but I've got a A4 clip board that I use for any casual sketching while sitting "watching "television etc.Or when I take visual notes when out walking to supplement a photograph to be worked on at a table at home. I find it best to put a thin piece of card underneath the drawing paper as the textured plastic shows in your marks otherwise.
Also it opens like a book so you can carry enough sheets of your chosen paper(s) without any trouble.An elegant solution to a number of problems.

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by Miatagrrl » Mon Oct 15, 2012 6:43 am

My preferred sketchbook size is about 5"x8" hardbound, which opens to about 8"x10" for spreads. It's a comfortable size to hold, either sitting or standing, and the hard cover makes it stable. The popular pocket size books are easier to hold and carry, but I find the page size too restrictive.

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by RajeshS » Mon Oct 15, 2012 9:54 am

:) I've kind of gotten used to the 5.5x3.5 Handbook.

But like Tina - I'm just beginning to think if I should try something like the 8x5s.

However those will have to be for the few times I carry a back pack or something. The "fitability" of my kit and the sketchbook - in my cargo shorts pockets is what is so attractive about the size.

Any larger and I lose that plus point.

The other thing that keeps hooked to the smaller size is the fact that I don't have my sketches scattered all over then - one size standardization has allowed me to start building my collection of sketchbooks. I'm on my fifth and they all look nice in one standard size :) :)

rajesh

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by gpathy » Mon Oct 15, 2012 6:05 pm

Though I sketch small.. I like to have the space to rest my wrist, etc.. with a small book, with no support, after a little while it gets real uncomfortable. so far, my sketching sessions have all been two to three hours, without much of a break. perhaps, I should rest and relax often?
has anyone tried those portable easels? overkill for a sketcher?

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by Miatagrrl » Tue Oct 16, 2012 4:17 pm

Several of my friends who sit while sketching use a board to clamp under their sketchbook and paints for stability and support. I usually end up standing for most of my outdoor sketching, so the board system doesn't work well, but I can see that it would help greatly when seated. For great ideas and tips on how to set this up, see Jamie Williams Grossman's excellent blog: http://hudsonvalleysketches.blogspot.co ... ching.html

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by Elva » Thu Oct 18, 2012 5:12 pm

My preferred size in an 8 1/2 x 11 inch hard bound sketchbook ... and I often use it standing, but more often on my lap in the car. I do have a 6 x 9 one I keep handy in case I'm carrying so much gear (camera, binoculars, art ...) that I just want to slip it in my fanny pack. Like Rajesh I like the look of a row of sketchbooks all lined up together..... all 41 of them!

I will say I feel the quality of paper in my 8 1/2 x 11 sketchbboks has declined over the years even though I try different brands, so recently I also keep a 9 x 12 one going in which I usually use my watercolors / ink and watercolor. I hate having two, but worse is to have crappy paper when I put a lot of work into something. I do a lot of writing and feel these sketchbooks are too spendy for the writing part.

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Measuring Kit

Post by mdmattin » Sat Nov 24, 2012 10:48 pm

I assembled a kit with measuring devices and have been playing around with them off and on.
measuring kit sm.jpg
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Clockwise from top left: ViewCatcher, Hor:ratio, mirror compass, bubble level, drafting compass, line level, reticuLanyard.

The ViewCatcher is a handy tool for framing a view out of a scene. It has presets for commonly used aspect ratios like 8" X 10",9" X 12" etc.

I sometimes use it in conjunction with Hor:ratio to set it to specific proportions or to search for interesting proportional relationships in a framing determined by the subject matter.

The mirror compass can be useful to predict changes in the direction of the sunlight, or to find your way home, for that matter, but its main purpose here is when combined with the bubble level:
leveler setup.jpg
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The idea is to be able to be able to find your own eye level and relate it to a point or points in the scene. Use the mirror to view the bubble level, and raise the whole contraption until the bottom of the compass base appears as a flat line, neither above nor below your central line of sight.
Here it is at the scene of the truss bridge.
leveler.jpg
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Juggling the compass and bubble level while looking into the distance takes some getting used to, but it's definitely doable. Jugging the device and a camera to take a picture at the moment it all aligns was really a challenge. I didn't quite get it to flat line from the camera's point of view, but I hope you get the concept. When my eye was actually level with the device, the horizon line was located right about where the central pier of the distant bridge starts to curve into the archway.
I find myself consistently surprised at how high my actual line of sight is when parallel to the ground. I must slouch around with downcast eyes a lot.
leveler sketch sm.jpg
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Here you can see the horizon drawn in, along with square reference box, principal vanishing point and diagonal vanishing point lines, as seen in Perspective Hacks. The heavier dots up and down the vertical line are measuring points taken with the drafting compass, used as a divider or caliper to measure lengths and distances. I use both the drafting compass and the line level as accessories to the ReticuLanyard, which is a made up name for the plastic ruler with an adjustable strap at the bottom of the photo. I threw it together based on this post by Rebecca, who also suggested the addition of a level.
The notation at the bottom, 45:15, is the relationship between the sight size of my "basic unit," for which I used the distance from the principal vanishing point to the bottom of the picture, and the drawn size of the same unit. I wrote it that way instead of simply 3:1 because I used the 60th scale on Hor:ratio to be able to easily multiply or subdivide observed measurements.

The combination of all of these devices and techniques really changes the way it feels to stand in an environment and try to come to grips with how to draw it. I don't think it's always appropriate to work this way; I still like to simply plunge in and see what happens when I eyeball it, but I think it's a good experience to calibrate your perceptual relationship to the space around you this way.

As with my other experiments with the dresser and climbing structure, I found that doing these careful measurements of the truss bridge revealed just what a rickety, out of true and fundamentally non-Euclidean structure it is. I'll think twice about riding my bike over it now.

Matthew

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by gpathy » Mon Nov 26, 2012 4:42 am

Ah! Matthew... you are undoubtedly the Gadget Guru! I admire your inventions..You are making a science out of observations! I simply love the mirror-compass-bubble level!

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Re: OUR sketching kits!!!

Post by RajeshS » Mon Nov 26, 2012 4:55 pm

Ya Matthew - this is a great mix of engineering and art!

I'm only in awe with all this!

rajesh

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